Monthly Archives: December 2017

She Has #MS and She Just Hiked 500 Miles!

Well, 460.75 miles (741.5 km), to be exact.

When I wrote about April Hester in late September, the headline on my post was “She Has MS and She’s Hiking 500 Miles.” Well, she did it, hiking the Palmetto Trail from Walhalla, in the South Carolina mountains, to Awendaw, on the coast. With husband Bernie alongside, April completed the hike on Nov. 3. The couple had expected the hike to take 35 to 40 days. They did it in 34!

April with MS Warrior

April with Madeline, newly diagnosed with MS, who drove eight hours to hike a bit with April.
(Photo courtesy of Bernie Hester)

April was diagnosed with MS in 1996, just after she turned 20 years old. Like many of us, she has balance and fatigue issues. Her legs can become tired, her foot sometimes drops and she falls a lot. April used “trekking” poles for the hike, even when the trail took them through through the downtown sections of some towns. She also wore ankle braces.

Needless to say, the hike wasn’t easy. Over the first seven days, the Hesters covered almost 100 miles of mountains, with some sections that were almost vertical walls. Bernie Hester tells me, “April nearly lost two toenails but we pushed through all the pain.”

The further she goes the stronger she gets

April is on one DMD, Gilenya. She also tries to eat a lot of vegetables and fish. But, Bernie says, the hiking exercise is what really builds April’s strength:

April crosses the stream

Tough going as April crosses a marsh. (Photo courtesy of Bernie Hester)

I can say from watching the progression that, as hard as it was on her in the beginning, the more exercise she did the stronger she got. The transformation happened right in front of me and it was amazing to watch. The hardest part was getting started with all the falls, short distances, quick breaks needed and learning curve of how to do long distance with MS. But once we got it down, she just got stronger and stronger.”
That’s probably a good take-away for all of us who are able to do some sort of exercise, but who don’t. Day three, as Bernie told me, was “a tough day as we ascended to Sassafras Mountain, the highest peak in South Carolina. April had a lot of struggles and we only managed to cover nine miles that day. But she pushed hard so we could make the summit and we were rewarded with a beautiful sunset.”

 

Isn’t that the kind of effort and reward that those of us with MS should try to seek every day?

Why did she hike?

April hiked the trail to raise awareness about the fight against MS. She also hoped to raise money for the National MS Society. Unfortunately, she fell short of a lofty goal. There’s still an opportunity to make a donation, however, by clicking here.

You can also read Bernie’s day-by-day journal of the hike by clicking on April and Bernie’s Trail Journals web page.

(This post first appeared as one of my columns on www.multiplesclerosisnewstoday.com)

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Flu Shot or No Flu Shot for MS Patients?

It’s that time of year again. The time of year where I keep seeing posts on MS social media sites asking, “should I get a flu shot?”

In my honest opinion, yes, definitely! There are certainly different opinions about this, but I think that my opinion is the same as that of nearly any doctor that you’ll ask. For example, here’s a what a couple of doctors have to say in a U.S. News and World Report article that’s specifically about MS and the flu:

Dr. Robert Shin, director of the Georgetown Multiple Sclerosis and Neuroimmunology Center: “The flu infection may stimulate the immune system, which may in turn trigger an MS attack.” Note that Shin says the flu, not the flu shot, is what should worry you. He says that getting the flu, or any illness, raises that chance that you’ll have a relapse or a worsening of your symptoms.

Dr. Amesh Adalja, an infectious disease specialist with the Johns Hopkins University Center for Health Security: “When you see flu outbreaks, you see MS relapses.” 

If you just think about what happens to your body in hot weather, or when you have a fever, then the flu-MS connection should be clear.

Docs sat the flu shot doesn’t give you the flu

Are you worried that getting a flu shot can give you the flu, or make you sick with something else? Doctors say don’t be. The flu shot uses a killed virus to protect you against the flu. So it’s highly unlikely that the vaccine will give you the flu. In fact, Dr. Shin says “infection really is impossible.”

On the other hand, the nasal flu vaccine is created from a live virus. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends against anyone using the nasal vaccine, because there are concerns about its effectiveness.

Since the flu vaccine takes about two weeks to become fully effective, it’s possible that some people who’ve had a shot will still get the flu. There have also been some years where the vaccine hasn’t been a good match for the strain of flu that was prevalent in those years. This may lead some people to believe that the shot gave them the flu when, in fact, it didn’t. It just, for whatever reason, failed to protect them from catching it.

For a lot more detail…

Here are a few places where you can obtain more information:

U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

National Multiple Sclerosis Society

A “STAT News” story, with an international overview

Of course, you should always check with your own doctor.

We had our shots

My wife and I got our flu shots in October, just as we’ve been getting them for many years. Neither of us has ever had a problem.

 

(This post first appeared as one of my columns on http://www.multiplesclerosisnewstoday.com)