Pills, shots or infusions for your MS?

[This first appeared as my column on http://www.multiplesclerosisnewstoday.com]

Oral multiple sclerosis meds appear, more and more, to be the first choice of patients who are just beginning to receive an MS treatment. A recent report by the independent marketing research firm Spherix Global Insights shows that oral disease-modifying therapies captured a significantly higher share of the market at the end of 2016 compared to 2015.  Tecfidera was at the top of the pills list with Aubagio gaining ground. But, final FDA approval of the infusion drug Ocrevus (ocrelizumab) could be a game-changer in the pill-shot-infusion decision.

Ocrevus

Neurologists and many MS patients are very familiar with Ocrevus. There’s a lot of chatter about it in online MS gathering spots, and many doctors report they intend to use it as soon as it is approved. And, even though most of the “buzz” is about prescribing Ocrevus for PPMS patients, it’s expected that a lot of doctors also are looking at it for those with RRMS. It could push ahead of other infusions, such as Tysabri and Lemtrada. as well as oral meds such as Tecfidera and Aubagio. Spherix reports more than one third of the neurologists it surveyed said they would have been likely to have started patients on Ocrevus, rather than on Tysabri, had it been available.

Weighing the treatment options

What drives these drug decisions? According to a Spherix report RealWorld Dynamix™: DMT New Starts in Multiple Sclerosis, the drivers include clinical considerations such as safety and efficacy, as well as non-clinical concerns including patient requests and the policies of the insurance coverage of those patients. Interestingly, it appears that neurologists are becoming more comfortable using high-efficacy DMTs right away for patients with aggressive MS, rather than working up to them from drugs with lower efficacy, but lower risk or cost.

Be involved in the decision

As the patient you should take an active role in your drug selection. A Spherix report released last fall showed that newly diagnosed MS patients are doing their research about DMTs. One in five of them are asking their neurologists about specific MS drugs. Those doctors say that 27% of their patients have a high degree of involvement in choosing the DMT they will use, 43% have moderate involvement, and 30% only low involvement. Unfortunately, more than 50% of the neurologists surveyed say that they, alone, choose the DMT the patient will use. About a third say they present a few choices, and then let the patient decide.  Only 10% of the docs say they present all of the options and then let the patient decide.

How did you decide which DMT to use? Are you thinking about changing?

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One thought on “Pills, shots or infusions for your MS?

  1. u2hearts

    I did shots from 1998-2010 or 2011 when Gilyenia came on the market. That was the first oral. I was done with shots. As my MS got worse, then I switched to infusion therapy. It’s all discussion and timing.

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply

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